Bio Building

Passive ice rink


In the Belgian city of Liege one was inaugurated skating ring on the ice which has received much praise from both critics of design than by fans of the green building. There skating ring was designed by the studio "L’Architettura Escaut" and is not simply the perfect place to run around on the ice but it is also an example of passive architecture which can boast an arena of 1200 seats.

The structure was built taking into account the thermal needs: the layer insulating it is about 10 inches thick, the walls have portholes and no large windows, and an ingenious HVAC system allows excellent thermal management.

Seeing the photos, the structure vaguely resembles a large white whale. This is because the external architecture has no corners but is rather rounded. There skating ring it is covered with over 200,000 aluminum tiles that create a reflective surface that helps disperse the sun's rays so as to reject heat without absorbing it.

The main entrance to the ice skating rink it looks like a big whale mouth, entering visitors might feel a bit like Jonah, especially when observing the ribs of the white whale: the roof of the structure is given by a massive metal skeleton.

Among the advantages of the structure there is the HVAC system with a heat pump with two compression units of 1,000 kW, the system, by recovering the air, is able to keep the ice rink surface frozen. The heat collected by the pumps is then redirected to the boilers for the production of hot water and to heat other areas of the building such as the cafeteria and an adjacent shopping center.

As for the arena, the seats that make it up were recovered from an old structure that houses the "Grand Palais des fetes" during the 1939 Universal Exposition.

L'thermal insulator it also guarantees sound insulation, so during hockey games, even with a packed audience and classic stadium choirs, the noise levels emitted by the building will be more than silent!



Video: HD Tonya Harding - 1994 Lillehammer Olympic - Free Skating (January 2022).